Hard learned life lessons...

Posts from Jan. 1, 2018 to the present. Plus important announcements. (ICD warning sounds)

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ROBO Pop
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Hard learned life lessons...

Post by ROBO Pop » October 24th, 2018, 11:07 am

I’m reasonably certain this has happened to some of you guys. You think you have it hidden from prying eyes, but somebody notices that massive bulge protruding through your clothes, giving away your deepest secret. The peeper, being duly impressed unwittingly spews forth the words “my God that thing is huge how can you walk around with that sticking out?” You bet folks, despite rhetoric to the contrary, size does matter.

Last night I found out the hard way how much size matters.

I was carrying a huge water trough for our dogs, which probably weighed in at 100 pounds through the dining room. Alright, it was a large plastic bowl but still you get the gist. As I traversed past the table, the lights inexplicably went out. I later discovered it wasn’t the house lights that went dark.
While medically, I was unconscious, I sensed time in slow motion but was unable to react. In my mind I realized I was toppling headlong before crashing into a chair and the massive oak dining table finally ending the adventure by kissing the carpet. Cup half full, the carpet needed to be cleaned anyway.

I realize this morning after admiring the gorgeous bluing of my skin that this episode could have resulted in far more serious injuries had it not been for my ginormous protrusion absorbing the majority of impact and thereby protecting other parts of my body from damages.

Now a smarter person would immediately contact his Cardiologist for a device check after taking a direct blow to his CRT-D like I had last night, but you know I’m not the brightest. Still this is a lesson to us all to stop fretting about the size of our bulges, it’s life saving properties are far more important. Go ahead guys, brag and show off your bulge, don't be embarrassed, people will have bulge envy cause size matters...
Broken Heart
Nobody has ever survived life, but I'm trying...
My story and sticking to it
http://www.icdsupportgroup.org/board/vi ... 97&p=91375

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KansasAl
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by KansasAl » October 24th, 2018, 12:10 pm

ROBO Pop wrote:
October 24th, 2018, 11:07 am
I’m reasonably certain this has happened to some of you guys. You think you have it hidden from prying eyes, but somebody notices that massive bulge protruding through your clothes, giving away your deepest secret. The peeper, being duly impressed unwittingly spews forth the words “my God that thing is huge how can you walk around with that sticking out?” You bet folks, despite rhetoric to the contrary, size does matter.
Dang it. I started reading and just knew this was going to be one of those rare male bonding moments where we could quaff a few beer and commiserate
about our bellies. Alas, it wasn't to be.

Hope the table and chair are OK. consolsmile

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mykidsmom
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by mykidsmom » October 24th, 2018, 1:22 pm

well ok...so to cut to the chase..why did you fall....and the reason i ask is this....i was galloping up the side of our house with a bag of fecking macdonalds burgers for the kids in the pool...when boob i woke up..cracked skull, dislocated rotator cuff and my ICD under my chin....no one could confirm...although everyone suspected id had a cardiac arrest..the icd was undamaged and slipped into place while the drs were checking the brain damage.. took three pushes to get the rotator cuff back in cos id also chipped a bone...and i needed several stitches on the skull...unless you actually can see the reason for the fall.......how do you know it was just a fall ...considering the club were all members of.....im sure the water wasnt that heavy.....

Maybe a drs visit is in order...either way you were lucky
I think.....Therefore I am.!!!!!

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ROBO Pop
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by ROBO Pop » October 24th, 2018, 2:25 pm

mykidsmom wrote:
October 24th, 2018, 1:22 pm
well ok...so to cut to the chase..why did you fall....
Maybe a drs visit is in order...either way you were lucky
I've no doubt the root cause, not my first rodeo and as you said considering our membership... I fell due to a condition known as Syncope, which is Latin for light in the loafers...it's a temporary rapid loss of consciousness due to insufficient blood flow to the brain combined with low blood pressure. Usually strikes without warning. You personal damages may vary. There's no point to running to the Dr, they can't do anything other than marvel I'm still alive and charge me prodigious amounts for that diagnosis. I will share this with him next time he sees me, he loves a funny story. They think of me as entertainment at his office.
Broken Heart
Nobody has ever survived life, but I'm trying...
My story and sticking to it
http://www.icdsupportgroup.org/board/vi ... 97&p=91375

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ROBO Pop
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by ROBO Pop » October 24th, 2018, 2:31 pm

KansasAl wrote:
October 24th, 2018, 12:10 pm
Hope the table and chair are OK.
Thankfully yeah they withstood the attack. The set belonged to my wife's late parents so you can well imagine had there been damage this episode would have been fatal for me.
Broken Heart
Nobody has ever survived life, but I'm trying...
My story and sticking to it
http://www.icdsupportgroup.org/board/vi ... 97&p=91375

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Ozchrissy
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by Ozchrissy » October 24th, 2018, 5:36 pm

Talk about protrusion, my device doesn't protrude as such, it looks like it is just sitting outside my skin. I have a very thin layer of skin covering it, and no muscle tone anywhere near it. You can literally see the connections on the top and the wires coming out of them. I am sure if you pressed hard enough you could read the writing on the top of the device. I don't have to describe what the devices look like, anyone looking at my shoulder can see that for themselves.

BUT I am very proud of my device and flash it at every opportunity. I really like to do it when someone is talking about their sore toe, and carrying on, and we get into a tit for tat medical stories. It normally stops them in their tracks. lmao4dx lmao4dx
“I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.” Carl Jung

Diagnosed with cardiomyopathy in 10/99
LBBB & VT diagnosed Feb 06
Guidant Biventricular Pacer ICD inserted Feb 06: Boston Scientific Incepta CRT-D inserted May, 2012
Oesophageal Cancer, 2012, Gall Bladder & Septicemia 2014 resulting in VFib and severe heart damage
Bare Metal Stent May, 2012 Mitral Valve replaced 2015
Meds: Entresto, Bicard, Coralan, Eurtorxsiq, Frusehexl, Spiractin, Sigmaxin, Creon, Warfarin,
Appropriate Shocks for Ventricular VFib.

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codman59
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by codman59 » October 25th, 2018, 6:09 am

My experience with syncope: went down while in a grocery store check-out line. No warning, no light headedness, just sudden blackness. I'm sure people in the lineup behind me were miffed about having to switch check-outs. 3 hairline fractures of the skull, which luckily enough weren't causing any swelling on the brain, thus nullifying the need to get the Black & Decker drill out and relieve some pressure.
What I have found in at least 3 of the shocks I've had (which they considered having with syncope as I was asleep in bed for them) is that first the cardiologist and EP go into a high-fiving session because the device worked (that worries me now that I think about it), then remind me I'm still alive because of it, then they say "more amiodarone". This last year has been a life-changer; I'm not springing back from those episodes like I did before.
Cardiomyapathy (reason unknown; suspect viral infection 1998), chf, gout, diabetes, asthma, bad hair.
Medtronics Virtuoso VR implanted Aug 28/08, single lead.

"The generation that would change the world is still looking for its car keys" - "The Rainmakers"

Craig

cpgal3246
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Joined: October 12th, 2018, 1:59 pm

Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by cpgal3246 » October 25th, 2018, 9:09 am

Excuse my ignorance but I'm new to all this. Why didn't the device pace your heart so that you didn't experience syncope?

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Colin Pearson
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by Colin Pearson » October 25th, 2018, 10:36 am

cpgal3246 wrote:
October 25th, 2018, 9:09 am
Excuse my ignorance but I'm new to all this. Why didn't the device pace your heart so that you didn't experience syncope?
Your ICD will always try and do this in the first instance but sometimes a person will go straight into VF, rather than into VT then VF or just VT. For four of my five shocks I've gone almost instantly into VF and collapsed before the ICD could charge and shock me. The other time it was VT and I was conscoius.

And what happens is I pass out and hit hit the deck quicker and before the ICD has had time to charge for a shock, it typically takes 9-10 seconds from when the ICD decides you need a shock to charge and then deliver that shock.

The best shocks are always the ones where you are already unconsious but you can pay the price of smashing your face in and or banging your head on the way down.

And that is why the more sensible ICD'ers on here always wear a helmet of some sort.

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ROBO Pop
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by ROBO Pop » October 25th, 2018, 10:46 am

cpgal3246 wrote:
October 25th, 2018, 9:09 am
Excuse my ignorance but I'm new to all this. Why didn't the device pace your heart so that you didn't experience syncope?
Great question, wish more people would ask questions when they don't understand. My friend Colin did a great job describing one instance of dropping like a rock but in this case Ventricular Fibrillation was not the culprit, it was Syncope which again is due to low blood flow and pressure and is a mechanical function.

The simple answer is that Syncope has nothing to do with the electrical system of the heart but rather the fact my Ejection Fraction (output) is so low (under 20% EF). When combined with the use of blood pressure pills you create the perfect storm where your brain is not getting enough blood and oxygen that you black out. Many people experience what is called near syncope where when they stand up they get light headed and dizzy momentarily.

Like Codman, I'm a frequent flyer but have been fortunate in causing minimal damage...so far.

Your device looks for electrical anomalies and responds per programmed settings by either pacing you or shocking you. Syncope is a mechanical function and does not send any electrical signals. In fact you may not realize that our devices do not detect a heart attack because it's not an electrical issue.

Hope this answers your question, but by all means ask if you need further clarification, that's why we are here
Broken Heart
Nobody has ever survived life, but I'm trying...
My story and sticking to it
http://www.icdsupportgroup.org/board/vi ... 97&p=91375

cpgal3246
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by cpgal3246 » October 25th, 2018, 11:30 am

ROBO Pop: So if I understand, your heart rate was probably ok, but you weren't getting enough oxygen to your brain due to the low ef/low B.P. and that's what caused the syncope?
In fact you may not realize that our devices do not detect a heart attack because it's not an electrical issue.
If you had a heart attack and your heart stopped, wouldn't the device deliver a shock? Is it possible for your heart rate to remain normal during a heart attack ?

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ROBO Pop
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by ROBO Pop » October 25th, 2018, 1:15 pm

cpgal3246 wrote:
October 25th, 2018, 11:30 am
ROBO Pop: So if I understand, your heart rate was probably ok, but you weren't getting enough oxygen to your brain due to the low ef/low B.P. and that's what caused the syncope?
In fact you may not realize that our devices do not detect a heart attack because it's not an electrical issue.
Good. Yes you understood. My heart is paced 100% at 80beats per minute so my heart rate was fine and I'm certain it wasn't due to V-Fib as I didn't get a Jesus Jolt.

cpgal3246 wrote:
October 25th, 2018, 11:30 am
If you had a heart attack and your heart stopped, wouldn't the device deliver a shock? Is it possible for your heart rate to remain normal during a heart attack ?
That's a common misconception, and even a lot of members here confuse this issue. A Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction) is caused by a lack of blood going into the heart usually by a blood clot or plaque (sludge) plugging the artery. When this happens the heart spasms trying to get blood. In fact when your heart stops (Flat line or asystole) your pacemaker will recognize it as missed beats and pace you. You only receive a Jesus Jolt (high voltage shock therapy) when there is an erratic heart beat such as V-Tach or V-Fib. My Cardiologist showed me one of my EKG's when I had a heart attack and while there was a bit of odd beats it was not tachycardia (fast) or fibrillation (random erractic) and my device did not react.
Broken Heart
Nobody has ever survived life, but I'm trying...
My story and sticking to it
http://www.icdsupportgroup.org/board/vi ... 97&p=91375

cpgal3246
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by cpgal3246 » October 25th, 2018, 1:58 pm

In fact when your heart stops (Flat line or asystole) your pacemaker will recognize it as missed beats and pace you. You only receive a Jesus Jolt (high voltage shock therapy) when there is an erratic heart beat such as V-Tach or V-Fib.
So if your heart stops and the device recognizes that and tries to pace you, will your heart start beating again? Of is it only the shock that would get your heart beating again?

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ROBO Pop
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by ROBO Pop » October 25th, 2018, 3:10 pm

cpgal3246 wrote:
October 25th, 2018, 1:58 pm
In fact when your heart stops (Flat line or asystole) your pacemaker will recognize it as missed beats and pace you. You only receive a Jesus Jolt (high voltage shock therapy) when there is an erratic heart beat such as V-Tach or V-Fib.
So if your heart stops and the device recognizes that and tries to pace you, will your heart start beating again? Of is it only the shock that would get your heart beating again?
What you see on TV dramas is pure nonsense, the shock will not start a heart that has stopped beating. The shock is used while your heart is beating at a really fast rate (V-Tach) or very erratically (V-Fib). The shock stuns your heart momentarily, and it actually stops, or pauses if you will, before starting itself again hopefully going into sinus (normal) rhythm. Yeah the pacemaker could possibly revive you but the doctors have a saying "You can't beat dead meat". Honest my Cardiologist told me that one. Anyway it simply means if your heart is dead nothing is going to revive it, and while a pacemaker may shoot signals to your heart telling it to beat it may not.
Broken Heart
Nobody has ever survived life, but I'm trying...
My story and sticking to it
http://www.icdsupportgroup.org/board/vi ... 97&p=91375

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Ozchrissy
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Re: Hard learned life lessons...

Post by Ozchrissy » October 25th, 2018, 6:30 pm

I love this post, it is great. On Wednesday this week, I had a bad heart day. I have been giving myself too much anxiety about my conference I am attending, and as a result, my heart reacted. Also, on the Sunday I had run out of my meds. kick butt I didn't realize that the chemist was open on Sunday morning and stupidly thought one day will be OK. :duh: Believe me I learned a hard lesson. By Monday morning I was helpless. Luckily my Chemist delivers, and they bought my pills around. (I get what we call a Webster pack where they pre-package all my tabs for me.) I have never done this before and believe me, I won't be doing it again.

Anyway, back to Wednesday, I knew I was in for a bad day in the morning. I had what I can only describe as Angina pain, you know the neck, arm, tingling, weird feeling you get. This resolved itself, and I presume my device jumped in and fixed me. However, about 1pm I got that, here we go again feeling, and I did get the shock. I was conscious, so it was VTac. I of course put myself to bed and came good. I look at it like a re-set button. At least this time I had a fair idea of why I got the shock, and why my heart was playing up.

I feel fantastic now, I believe it was triggered by a combination of my forgetting to get my meds and the pressure I was putting on myself personally about this conference. I am now relaxed, well sort of, about doing this conference, and of course back on my proper meds.

As for a heart attack, I have got pretty good arteries. My understanding of a heart attack is that it is not immediately life threatening, but it can lead to Cardiac Arrest or Vfib. The damage done to the heart as a result of the Heart Attack can cause the heart to respond with VFib.

Our gorgeous guys on here, Robbo and Colin have a better understanding than me of all the processes, and have explained it well.
“I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.” Carl Jung

Diagnosed with cardiomyopathy in 10/99
LBBB & VT diagnosed Feb 06
Guidant Biventricular Pacer ICD inserted Feb 06: Boston Scientific Incepta CRT-D inserted May, 2012
Oesophageal Cancer, 2012, Gall Bladder & Septicemia 2014 resulting in VFib and severe heart damage
Bare Metal Stent May, 2012 Mitral Valve replaced 2015
Meds: Entresto, Bicard, Coralan, Eurtorxsiq, Frusehexl, Spiractin, Sigmaxin, Creon, Warfarin,
Appropriate Shocks for Ventricular VFib.

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